Quantcast
Home / News / Government and Politics (page 34)

Government and Politics

Supreme Court ruling hobbles government’s ability to impose demands on developers (access required)

gavel

Land use attorneys across the state are hailing a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that greatly reduces the amount of leverage municipalities can wield in granting developers permits. A 5-4 majority in Koontz v. St. Johns River Water Management District held that the U.S. Constitution’s takings clause not only applies to cases in which a project is approved with “extortionate” conditions, but also to those denied when a developer refuses to agree to the coercive demands of the government.

Read More »

First look: City of Charlotte Zoning Ordinance assessment (access required)

justice statue

For just less than a year, Denver-based Clarion & Associates has been studying the city’s zoning ordinance and meeting with local stakeholders to give city officials recommendations on a possible future change to the ordinance. Clarion on Monday released the findings of its assessment on the city’s website, complete with plenty of criticism on the score-old ordinance that city officials will certainly take into consideration when deciding if they will draft a new zoning ordinance.

Read More »

Zoning panel approves Brookline apartments (access required)

Zoning CommitteeWEB

Zoning committee member Karen Labovitz’s change of heart sends a petition that would put 324 apartments in the Brookline subdivision to the City Council with the committee’s stamp of approval. The petition was likely to fail on a 3-2 vote when member Emma Allen pled for more robust discussion.

Read More »

Sign up: Builders may get a break on projects that require zoning board rulings (access required)

Sign of the times? Builders may catch a break if they pay attention to making signs for their rezoning requests.

When a local zoning board of adjustment rules in favor of a builder, the zoning battle is not necessarily over. That’s because the deadline for anyone to appeal such a ruling can be a moving target. And if the appeal succeeds, it can kill a project that at one point seemed a sure thing. But House Bill 276, which has passed the North Carolina House and is in the Senate Commerce Committee, would set a much more firm appeal deadline, provided the builder who got the favorable ruling knows the rudiments of making and displaying a sign.

Read More »